egg cups

I could – I could really do with one of these right now.

last night, a crime happened. my innocent, soft loaf of delicious, seedy (not seedy but seed-y), wholemeal bread was ripped from its sanctuary atop my oven and tossed to the floor, packet ripped open, bits of plastic and crumbs everywhere. when I gingerly lifted it from its prone position, the bread slices fell out like the saddest flood of emotion.

the suspects of this violation? the cat from next door, or a bird – whichever animal which had come in early last week to do the same unspeakable crime to a piece of jerky we had left wrapped on the counter.

pray for bread loaves everywhere, everyone. I hope you get to eat a lovely breakfast yourself full of eggs and ham and delicious things!

xx

p.s. as some quick instruction: flatten your slice bread with a rolling pin, cut into the four corners an inch inward, fit into a muffin pan, and fill with ham and cheese. top it off with an egg, and bake at 175c until jiggly but set. at the beginning, it’ll take longer than you expect, but it’ll finish faster than you’d think (the same can be said of the eating)!

baker & cook, chip bee gardens

baker and cook is this chain of bakery-cafe that’s been around for ages – my first time finally at one, and I think it’s an easy choice for breakfast or brunch on the weekends, if you’re not into trying too hard. this particular outlet – as would suit the demographic in this locale – is packed with expatriates and their kids, and gets a little manic (service is both harried and difficult to get). but the food is decent, and good for a meal if you can score a seat.

it’s a simple menu of morning goods like scrambled eggs and breakfast meats – bulked up with an array of baked goodies like croissants and bagels (they also bake cakes and breads, if you’re so inclined). it all looks pretty much as-you’d-expect, which is to say it’s appealing in a homey, familiar way – and I expect most of it to be good eating.

my granola was a generous portion served up with a berry compote and greek-ish yogurt, with milk on the side. mashed up and left to sit, it softens into a nice, not-too-sweet bowl of wholesomeness.

the price points are reasonable (though really, this expensive climate means even reasonable is probably too much), and the cafe is casual, comfortable seating. if only it weren’t quite so packed – but then again, that’s the price you pay for good food.

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the waterfall, shangri-la hotel singapore

wholesome, chichi, yummy-mummy-abound buffet of antipasti and salads at this cafe in the rather-tough-to-get-to shangri-la hotel (they serve up some fantastic mains too). I have finally made my way to this place, and it couldn’t be sooner – the food is light and clean (on the palate; hygiene here taken for granted) and varied in both flavor and color, and there’s a relaxing vibe to this place that lends itself to lazy weekend brunches.

great service too, and reasonable prices given the quality and type of food served – it’s worth the drive/ trek.

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the missing pan, bukit timah

one of the better brunch places in the new morass of food establishments – how do they keep popping up?! – with generous portions, good cooking, and a beautiful space (and bad ventilation, though that depends on where you’re sitting). I’m very pleased with this place – I haven’t left so full and satisfied after brunch for a long time, service is mostly prompt and food comes quickly, and prices aren’t crazy.

very good, and well worth a visit.

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pear loaf

a twist on the standard banana bread recipe, this one incorporates grated pears and walnuts in a cinnamon-kissed dough – a one-bowl recipe that emerges from the oven with a lovely crack and the homey smell of cinnamon.

and isn’t it a beautiful brown loaf? it’s often difficult to photograph a rustic sort of cake, without the help of gorgeous frosting to mask that monotony – but when it comes out all glossy and shiny this way – it’s incomparable in appeal.

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roadside banhmi, ho chi minh

located at 37 nguyen trai.

we were drawn to this store by the smell of delicious grilled meat on charcoal – vietnamese grilled meats almost always have a touch of sweetness in their marinades, so they caramelize very nicely and make it known to you by way of the maillard effect.

this lady was grilling tiny patties of meat – slider-style, if you’re being hipster – on a tiny grill next to her store, forming them as she went along from a large bowl of mince. we ordered a banh mi – which is a vietnamese sandwich made with pickles, fresh vegetables and certain meat options – and it came with four gorgeous patties slid between a crusty french loaf atop pickled radish and carrot, as well as some crisp lettuce.

street food at its best, and cheapest.

p.s. meds noticed the google results on the side of the store – which led me to find out that this might be saigon’s best banh mi at 37 nguyen trai! what a good find, and so brilliant that she noticed – really made this foodie’s day!

borough market, take 2










I’m feeling quite terribly homesick for london right now, so I thought I ought to dash this one right off into the blogosphere. there is something about london in winter, and I wish I were back there – even with the blighting cold that seems to have hit earlier this year.

you’ll see now that my photos mark the date at which I was in london – it was barely midway through autumn where pumpkins abounded with mushrooms and other seasonal goodies, and mulled wine was starting to make its presence felt in the market through long queues at stores and the smell of alcohol and spices wafting through the air.

the medley of mushrooms in the second photograph are especially beautiful in light of the fact that you can barely get such a variety in singapore – and if they are available here, the prices are far too ridiculous. I had also never seen mushrooms as blue as the ones I saw at the market that day, and I think they would be amazing wilted down in a knob of butter and grated garlic.

there is much to enjoy in singapore food-wise, but especially on days like this one, looking at photos of my adventures in london take me back to a wonderfully unforgettable – and dearly-missed – period of my life.

recipease, london (the deli)






pretty little deli belonging to jamie oliver in the heart of notting hill. this is a sequel to my earlier post on the cafe at this same site – and I have to say that just as much as I enjoyed breakfast at the cafe, I loved walking about the deli. bread, pastries, jams, oils, chocolates, utensils – I mean you name (a food-associated) it, they probably have it.

these photos are just a tiny distillation of the huge space downstairs. there is a sort of giant island in the centre, where people take cooking lessons – that night there were a group of adults learning various methods of cuttings vegetables, such as dicing, matchstick-ing and julienning. surrounding this are shelves full of food: jamie-branded jars of jam and mustards and pickles, colourful bottles of oils and vinegars, and loads of straight-away-edibles such as chocolates and biscuits.

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banana coconut cake








so I’ve finally managed to upload the photos in full-size as I’d like them – I’ll be updating the older posts so you get a better look at the food I’ve been eating (and baking).

this is another loaf-ish cake, and builds up on the standard banana cake recipe – also a nice change from having either coconut or banana. there’s something very gratifying about quickbreads – you bake them up very quickly and they make your house smell great, and it doesn’t hurt that they taste very good too.

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coconut loaf cake






I am your dedicated provider of loaf cake recipes. I’ve just had a look at my home archives, and I realise that I keep true to my love of rustic loaf cakes, instead of fussier decorated cakes (which lots of other bloggers do very well). this has to do first with my asian upbringing – and I’m sure I’ve told you this already – where cakes are usually plain and undecorated sponges (here I am conveniently neglecting the presence of those cream monstrosities so often present in chinatowns around the world that my family have never ordered).

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